Evidence for ESSA Celebrates its First Anniversary

Penguin 02 22 18On February 28, 2017 we launched Evidence for ESSA (www.evidenceforessa.org), our website providing the evidence to support educational programs according to the standards laid out in the Every Child Succeeds Act in December, 2015.

Evidence for ESSA began earlier, of course. It really began one day in September, 2016, when I heard leaders of the Institute for Education Sciences (IES) and the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) announce that the WWC would not be changed to align with the ESSA evidence standards. I realized that no one else was going to create scientifically valid, rapid, and easy-to-use websites providing educators with actionable information on programs meeting ESSA standards. We could do it because our group at Johns Hopkins University, and partners all over the world, had been working for many years creating and updating another website, the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (BEE; www.bestevidence.org).BEE reviews were not primarily designed for practitioners and they did not align with ESSA standards, but at least we were not starting from scratch.

We assembled a group of large membership organizations to advise us and to help us reach thoughtful superintendents, principals, Title I directors, and others who would be users of the final product. They gave us invaluable advice along the way. We also assembled a technical working group (TWG) of distinguished researchers to advise us on key decisions in establishing our website.

It is interesting to note that we have not been able to obtain adequate funding to support Evidence for ESSA. Instead, it is mostly being written by volunteers and graduate students, all of whom are motivated only by a passion for evidence to improve the education of students.

A year after launch, Evidence for ESSA has been used by more than 36,000 unique users, and I hear that it is very useful in helping states and districts meet the ESSA evidence standards.

We get a lot of positive feedback, as well as complaints and concerns, to which we try to respond rapidly. Feedback has been important in changing some of our policies and correcting some errors and we are glad to get it.

At this moment we are thoroughly up-to-date on reading and math programs for grades pre-kindergarten to 12, and we are working on science, writing, social-emotional outcomes, and summer school. We are also continuing to update our more academic BEE reviews, which draw from our work on Evidence for ESSA.

In my view, the evidence revolution in education is truly a revolution. If the ESSA evidence standards ultimately prevail, education will at long last join fields such as medicine and agriculture in a dynamic of practice to development to evaluation to dissemination to better practice, in an ascending spiral that leads to constantly improving practices and outcomes.

In a previous revolution, Thomas Jefferson said, “If I had to choose between government without newspapers and newspapers without government, I’d take the newspapers.” In our evidence revolution in education, Evidence for ESSA, the WWC, and other evidence sources are our “newspapers,” providing the information that people of good will can use to make wise and informed decisions.

Evidence for ESSA is the work of many dedicated and joyful hands trying to provide our profession with the information it needs to improve student outcomes. The joy in it is the joy in seeing teachers, principals, and superintendents see new, attainable ways to serve their children.

This blog was developed with support from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Foundation.

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New Policy Institute at Johns Hopkins Will Promote Evidence in Education

Not so long ago, it was awfully lonely advocating for enhancing the role of evidence in educational policy. I’m delighted to see that this is changing, and new allies are taking up the cause. I’ve written before about Results for America, the new efforts supported by the Arnold Foundation, and other developments that are moving forward evidence-based education, including support from OMB and from the Knowledge Alliance.

Now there is yet another force for evidence-based policy in education, and it is from my own university, Johns Hopkins. The Johns Hopkins University School of Education has just announced a new policy center, to be led by David Steiner, who previously was the dean at the School of Education at Hunter College and, before that, Commissioner of Education for the state of New York. David is joined by a Hunter colleague, Ashley Berner. They hope to create a policy center that is non-partisan and committed to supporting evidence in education. Because of his background, David is particularly interested in mobilizing state superintendents and other education leaders beyond the one-mile radius of Congress and the White House, where evidence-based reform has had its main impact so far.

The union of David and Ashley with the Johns Hopkins School of Education has extraordinary potential. They bring deep experience in educational leadership and policy to a School of Education that already has a lot going in in that arena. Beyond our own efforts at the Center for Research and Reform in Education (CRRE), there is Bob Balfanz and his colleagues at the Center for Social Organization of Schools. Our dean, David Andrews, is very committed to making an impact in national policy. Besides, we are in Baltimore, a one-hour train trip from Capitol Hill that costs $7 each way.

There is a lot to do to move education policy toward a strong evidence base, and the movement, such as it is, needs all the help it can get. ESEA is up for reauthorization, and maybe this time we can get evidence to be central to competitive programs and perhaps even formula programs, such as Title I. This is an exciting time for evidence-based policy, and all of us involved in it should welcome David and Ashley to our ranks!

Reading and Vision

A few years ago, I was touring a ruined abbey in Scotland. In a small museum containing objects found in excavations of the site were a pair of eyeglasses worn by monks in the 13th century.

The relationship between vision and reading is not exactly news. Since most adults eventually need reading glasses, most people reading this blog probably have personal experience with the transformational impact they can have.

Along with colleagues at the Johns Hopkins Hospital’s Wilmer Eye Clinic and the Johns Hopkins School of Education, we are doing a study of the relationship between vision and reading in inner-city schools in Baltimore. Our project is not finished, so I can’t report on all aspects of our findings. But what we have found so far is profoundly disturbing.

We are giving comprehensive vision tests to second- and third-graders in some of the most impoverished schools in the city. We are finding high rates of visual impairment, which can be corrected by eyeglasses. Yet only 1 to 3 percent of the children have glasses in school.

The state of Maryland requires vision screening in first grade, and many of these children were found to need glasses previously. Yet a hundred things go wrong in getting glasses on kids’ faces in inner-city schools. Some kids are missed in the screening. Those who are identified get a letter sent to the parents, who may or may not follow up. Some cannot afford glasses, while others qualify for assistance to purchase glasses but do not know how to go through the procedures to get them. Glasses frequently get broken or lost or stolen, and there are no procedures to replace them. As a result, few kids who need them have glasses in school, even just one year after the screening year.

A key factor in all of this is that vision is seen as a health problem, not the school’s problem. Schools do not have resources for eyeglasses, so even though they are accountable for children’s reading, and even though school leaders and teachers know full well that a lot of their kids just need glasses, they feel helpless in solving this simple problem. Title I funds, for example, cannot be used for glasses. The result is that many children are receiving very expensive remedial services, tutoring, or special education, when a $20 pair of glasses would actually solve the problem.

In our project, we are testing kids, and, for those who need them, we are providing two pairs of glasses, one for home and one for school. Teachers are given craft boxes to hold the glasses and facilitate distributing them each day. If glasses are broken, they are replaced. Eyeglasses are in these days, and the kids are very proud of their glasses. Compared with other interventions for struggling readers, the cost of a few pairs of glasses is trivial. Not every struggling reader is struggling due to poor eyesight, but imagine if 20 or 10 or even 5 percent of children in high-poverty schools are struggling in reading or other subjects due to vision problems that are easily remediated with ordinary eyeglasses.

I’m always reluctant to get ahead of the data, but imagine for a moment what it would mean if we do find that significant numbers of inner-city kids are failing year after year just because they lack glasses. Hopefully, this finding would lead to government and private programs throughout the U.S. providing eyeglasses in schools and giving teachers and administrators responsibility to see that children receive and use their glasses. This could make a huge difference in one easily recognizable subgroup of struggling readers.

At a larger level, think what such a finding might say about poverty and education. Educators naturally seek educational solutions to educational problems in high-poverty schools, reasoning that they cannot solve problems of housing, crime, unemployment, and so on. Yet there may be some non-educational interventions that they could use to improve student outcomes. What matters is the outcomes, and it is crucial that proven solutions be allowed to cross traditional boundaries if they require it.

At a larger level still, consider how families get into poverty in the first place. How many kids with poor eyesight fail in school, lose motivation, and ultimately lose access to positive futures? How many impoverished parents were once children with poor eyesight, or other easily solved health difficulties? How many inner-city communities suffer from having many young people who perceive no hope due to reading difficulties that could have been prevented?

Eyeglasses are not new, and they are not magic. Yet they may well be part of a solution to fundamental and persistent problems of education.