When Developers Commission Studies, What Develops?

I have the greatest respect for commercial developers and disseminators of educational programs, software, and professional development. As individuals, I think they genuinely want to improve the practice of education, and help produce better outcomes for children. However, most developers are for-profit companies, and they have shareholders who are focused on the bottom line. So when developers carry out evaluations, or commission evaluation companies to do so on their behalf, perhaps it’s best to keep in mind a bit of dialogue from a Marx Brothers movie. Someone asks Groucho if Chico is honest. “Sure,” says Groucho, “As long as you watch him!”

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         A healthy role for developers in evidence-based reform in education is desirable. Publishers, software developers, and other commercial companies have a lot of capital, and a strong motivation to create new products with evidence of effectiveness that will stand up to scrutiny. In medicine, most advances in practical drugs and treatments are made by drug companies. If you’re a cynic, this may sound disturbing. But for a long time, the federal government has encouraged drug companies to do development and evaluation of new drugs, but they have strict rules about what counts as conclusive evidence. Basically, the government says, following Groucho, “Are drug companies honest? Sure, as long as you watch ‘em.”

            In our field, we may want to think about how to do this. As one contribution, my colleague Betsy Wolf did some interesting research on outcomes of studies sponsored by developers, compared to those conducted by independent, third parties. She looked at all reading/literacy and math studies listed on the What Works Clearinghouse database. The first thing she found was very disturbing. Sure enough, the effect sizes for the developer-commissioned studies (ES = +0.27, n=73) were twice as large as those for independent studies (ES = +0.13, n=96). That’s a huge difference.

Being a curious person, Betsy wanted to know why developer-commissioned studies had effect sizes that were so much larger than independent ones. We now know a lot about study characteristics that inflate effect sizes. The most inflationary are small sample size, use of measures made by researchers or developers (rather than independent measures), and use of quasi-experiments instead of randomized designs. Developer-commissioned studies were in fact much more likely to use researcher/developer-made measures (29% in developer-commissioned vs. 8% in independent studies), and randomized vs. quasi-experiments (51% quasi-experiments for developer-commissioned studies vs. 15% quasi-experiments for independent studies). However, sample sizes were similar in developer-commissioned and independent studies. And most surprising, statistically controlling for all of these factors did not reduce the developer effect by very much.

If there is so much inflation of effect sizes in developer-commissioned studies, then how come controlling for the largest factors that usually cause effect size inflation does not explain the developer effect?

There is a possible reason for this, which Betsy cautiously advances (since it cannot be proven). Perhaps the reason that effect sizes are inflated in developer-commissioned studies is not due to the nature of the studies we can find, but to the studies we cannot find. There has long been recognition of what is called the “file drawer effect,” which happens when studies that do not obtain a positive outcome disappear (into a file drawer). Perhaps developers are especially likely to hide disappointing findings. Unlike academic studies, which are likely to exist as technical reports or dissertations, perhaps commercial companies have no incentive to make null findings findable in any form.

This may not be true, or it may be true of some but not other developers. But if government is going to start taking evidence a lot more seriously, as it has done with the ESSA evidence standards (see www.evidenceforessa.org), it is important to prevent developers, or any researchers, from hiding their null findings.

There is a solution to this problem that is heading rapidly in our direction. This is pre-registration. In pre-registration, researchers or evaluators must file a study design, measures, and analyses about to be used in a study, but perhaps most importantly, pre-registration announces that a study exists, or will exist soon. If a developer pre-registered a study but that study never showed up in the literature, this might be a cause for losing faith in the developer. Imagine that the What Works Clearinghouse, Evidence for ESSA, and journals refused to accept research reports on programs unless the study had been pre-registered, and unless all other studies of the program were made available.

Some areas of medicine use pre-registration, and the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness is moving toward introducing a pre-registration process for education. Use of pre-registration and other safeguards could be a boon to commercial developers, as it is to drug companies, because it could build public confidence in developer-sponsored research. Admittedly, it would take many years and/or a lot more investment in educational research to make this practical, but there are concrete steps we could take in that direction.

I’m not sure I see any reason we shouldn’t move toward pre-registration. It would be good for Groucho, good for Chico, and good for kids. And that’s good enough for me!

Photo credit: By Paramount Pictures (source) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

This blog was developed with support from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Foundation.

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