Evidence for ESSA Celebrates its First Anniversary

Penguin 02 22 18On February 28, 2017 we launched Evidence for ESSA (www.evidenceforessa.org), our website providing the evidence to support educational programs according to the standards laid out in the Every Child Succeeds Act in December, 2015.

Evidence for ESSA began earlier, of course. It really began one day in September, 2016, when I heard leaders of the Institute for Education Sciences (IES) and the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) announce that the WWC would not be changed to align with the ESSA evidence standards. I realized that no one else was going to create scientifically valid, rapid, and easy-to-use websites providing educators with actionable information on programs meeting ESSA standards. We could do it because our group at Johns Hopkins University, and partners all over the world, had been working for many years creating and updating another website, the Best Evidence Encyclopedia (BEE; www.bestevidence.org).BEE reviews were not primarily designed for practitioners and they did not align with ESSA standards, but at least we were not starting from scratch.

We assembled a group of large membership organizations to advise us and to help us reach thoughtful superintendents, principals, Title I directors, and others who would be users of the final product. They gave us invaluable advice along the way. We also assembled a technical working group (TWG) of distinguished researchers to advise us on key decisions in establishing our website.

It is interesting to note that we have not been able to obtain adequate funding to support Evidence for ESSA. Instead, it is mostly being written by volunteers and graduate students, all of whom are motivated only by a passion for evidence to improve the education of students.

A year after launch, Evidence for ESSA has been used by more than 36,000 unique users, and I hear that it is very useful in helping states and districts meet the ESSA evidence standards.

We get a lot of positive feedback, as well as complaints and concerns, to which we try to respond rapidly. Feedback has been important in changing some of our policies and correcting some errors and we are glad to get it.

At this moment we are thoroughly up-to-date on reading and math programs for grades pre-kindergarten to 12, and we are working on science, writing, social-emotional outcomes, and summer school. We are also continuing to update our more academic BEE reviews, which draw from our work on Evidence for ESSA.

In my view, the evidence revolution in education is truly a revolution. If the ESSA evidence standards ultimately prevail, education will at long last join fields such as medicine and agriculture in a dynamic of practice to development to evaluation to dissemination to better practice, in an ascending spiral that leads to constantly improving practices and outcomes.

In a previous revolution, Thomas Jefferson said, “If I had to choose between government without newspapers and newspapers without government, I’d take the newspapers.” In our evidence revolution in education, Evidence for ESSA, the WWC, and other evidence sources are our “newspapers,” providing the information that people of good will can use to make wise and informed decisions.

Evidence for ESSA is the work of many dedicated and joyful hands trying to provide our profession with the information it needs to improve student outcomes. The joy in it is the joy in seeing teachers, principals, and superintendents see new, attainable ways to serve their children.

This blog was developed with support from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Foundation.

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