What if a Sears Catalogue Married Consumer Reports?

blog_3-15-18_familyreading_500x454When I was in high school, I had a summer job delivering Sears catalogues. I borrowed my mother’s old Chevy station wagon and headed out fully laden into the wilds of the Maryland suburbs of Washington.

I immediately learned something surprising. I thought of a Sears catalogue as a big book of advertisements. But the people to whom I was delivering them often saw it as a book of dreams. They were excited to get their catalogues. When a neighborhood saw me coming, I became a minor celebrity.

Thinking back on those days, I was thinking about our Evidence for ESSA website (www.evidenceforessa.org). I realized that what I wanted it to be was a way to communicate to educators the wonderful array of programs they could use to improve outcomes for their children. Sort of like a Sears catalogue for education. However, it provides something that a Sears catalogue does not: Evidence about the effectiveness of each catalogue entry. Imagine a Sears catalogue that was married to Consumer Reports. Where a traditional Sears catalogue describes a kitchen gadget, “It slices and dices, with no muss, no fuss!”, the marriage with Consumer Reports would instead say, “Effective at slicing and dicing, but lots of muss. Also fuss.”

If this marriage took place, it might take some of the fun out of the Sears catalogue (making it a book of realities rather than a book of dreams), but it would give confidence to buyers, and help them make wise choices. And with proper wordsmithing, it could still communicate both enthusiasm, when warranted, and truth. But even more, it could have a huge impact on the producers of consumer goods, because they would know that their products would need to be rigorously tested and found to be able to back up their claims.

In enhancing the impact of research on the practice of education, we have two problems that have to be solved. Just like the “Book of Dreams,” we have to help educators know the wonderful array of programs available to them, programs they may never had heard of. And beyond the particular programs, we need to build excitement about the opportunity to select among proven programs.

In education, we make choices not for ourselves, but on behalf of our children. Responsible educators want to choose programs and practices that improve the achievement of their students. Something like a marriage of the Sears catalogue and Consumer Reports is necessary to address educators’ dreams and their need for information on program outcomes. Users should be both excited and informed. Information usually does not excite. Excitement usually does not inform. We need a way to do both.

In Evidence for ESSA, we have tried to give educators a sense that there are many solutions to enduring instructional problems (excitement), and descriptions of programs, outcomes, costs, staffing requirements, professional development, and effects for particular subgroups, for example (information).

In contrast to Sears catalogues, Evidence for ESSA is light (Sears catalogues were huge, and ultimately broke the springs on my mother’s station wagon). In contrast to Consumer Reports, Evidence for ESSA is free.  Every marriage has its problems, but our hope is that we can capture the excitement and the information from the marriage of these two approaches.

This blog was developed with support from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Foundation.

Picture source: Nationaal Archief, the Netherlands

 

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