Evidence-Based Does Not Equal Evidence-Proven

Chemist

As I speak to educational leaders about using evidence to help them improve outcomes for students, there are two words I hear all the time that give me the fantods (as Mark Twain would say):

Evidence-based

            I like the first word, “evidence,” just fine, but the second word, “based,” sort of negates the first one. The ESSA evidence standards require programs that are evidence-proven, not just evidence-based, for various purposes.

“Evidence-proven” means that a given program, practice, or policy has been put to the test. Ideally, students, teachers, or schools have been assigned at random to use the experimental program or to remain in a control group. The program is provided to the experimental group for a significant period of time, at least a semester, and then final performance on tests that are fair to both groups are compared, using appropriate statistics.

If your doctor gives you medicine, it is evidence proven. It isn’t just the same color or flavor as something proven, it isn’t just generally in line with what research suggests might be a good idea. Instead, it has been found to be effective, compared to current standards of care, in rigorous studies.

“Evidence-based,” on the other hand, is one of those wiggle words that educators love to use to indicate that they are up-to-date and know what’s expected, but don’t actually intend to do anything different from what they are doing now.

Evidence-based is today’s equivalent of “based on scientifically-based research” in No Child Left Behind. It sure sounded good, but what educational program or practice can’t be said to be “based on” some scientific principle?

In a recent Brookings article Mark Dynarski wrote about state ESSA plans, and conversations he’s heard among educators. He says that the plans are loaded with the words “evidence-based,” but with little indication of what specific proven programs they plan to implement, or how they plan to identify, disseminate, implement, and evaluate them.

I hope the ESSA evidence standards give leaders in even a few states the knowledge and the courage to insist on evidence-proven programs, especially in very low-achieving “school improvement” schools that desperately need the very best approaches. I remain optimistic that ESSA can be used to expand evidence-proven practices. But will it in fact have this impact? That remains to be proven.

This blog was developed with support from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Foundation.

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3 thoughts on “Evidence-Based Does Not Equal Evidence-Proven

  1. So true. I have been happy to support Hattie’s Visible Learning in school support program because it is evidence based. Not so easy to prove the efficacy and impact of the program though. Maybe in pockets but certainly not at scale.

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