The Mystery of the Chinese Dragon: Why Isn’t the WWC Up to Date?

As evidence becomes more important in educational practice and policy, it is increasingly critical that it be up-to-date. This sounds obvious. Of course we’d prefer evidence from recent studies, which are more likely to have been done under social and political conditions like those that exist today, using standards like those prevailing today.

However, there are reasons that up-to-date evidence is especially important in today’s policy environment. Up-to-date evidence is critical because it is far more likely than earlier research to meet very high methodological standards. Because of substantial investments by the U.S. Department of Education and others, there has been an outpouring of top-quality, randomized, usually third-party evaluations of programs for all subjects and grade levels, published from 2012 to the present.

The reason this matters in practice is that to satisfy ESSA evidence standards, many educators are using the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) to identify proven programs. And the What Works Clearinghouse is very slow in reviewing studies, and therefore does not contain many of the latest, and therefore highest-quality studies.

The graph below illustrates the problem. It compares all secondary literacy (grades 6-12) studies reported by the WWC as of fall, 2017, on the orange line. The blue line represents a review of research on the same topic by Baye et al. (2017; see www.bestevidence.org). I think the graph resembles a Chinese dragon, with its jaws wide open and a long tail. The sort of dragon you see in Chinese New Year’s parades.

 

 

What the graph shows is that while the number of studies published up to 2009 were about equal for Baye et al. and WWC, they diverged sharply in 2010 (thus the huge open jaws). Baye et al. reported on 58 studies published in 2010 to 2017. WWC reported on only 6, and none at all from 2016 or 2017.

The same patterns are apparent throughout the WWC. Across every topic and grade level, the WWC has only 7 accepted studies from 2014, 7 from 2015, zero from 2016, and zero from 2017.

It is likely that every one of the Baye et al. studies would meet WWC standards. Yet the WWC has just not gotten to them.

It’s important to note that the What Works Clearinghouse is plenty busy. Recent studies are often included in Quick Reviews, Single Study Reviews, Grant Competition Reports, and Practice Guides. However, an educator going to the WWC for guidance on what works will go to Find What Works and click on one of the 12 topic areas, which will list programs. They then may filter their search and go to intervention reports.

These intervention reports are not integrated with Quick Reviews, Single Study Reviews, Grant Competition Reports, or Practice Guides, so the user has no easy way to find out about more recent evaluations, if they in fact appear anywhere in any of these reports. Even if users did somehow find additional information on a program in one of these supplemental reports, the information may be incomplete. In many cases, the supplemental report only notes whether a study meets WWC standards, but does not provide any information about what the outcome was.

The slow pace of the WWC reviews is problematic for many reasons. In addition to missing out on the strongest and most recent studies, the WWC does not register changes in the evidence base for programs already in its database. New programs may not appear at all, leaving readers to wonder why.

Any website developer knows that if users go to a website and are unable to find what they expect to find, they are unlikely to come back. The WWC is a website, and it cannot expect many users to check back every few months to see if programs that interest them, which they know to exist, have been added lately.

In the context of the ESSA evidence standards, the slow pace of the WWC is particularly disturbing. Although the WWC has chosen not to align itself with ESSA standards, many educators use the WWC as a guide to which programs are likely to meet ESSA standards. Failing to keep the WWC up to date may convince many users seeking ESSA information that there are few programs meeting either WWC or ESSA standards.

Educators need accurate, up-to-date information to make informed choices for their students. I hope the WWC will move quickly to provide its readers with essential, useful data on today’s evidence supporting today’s programs. It’s going to have to catch up with the Chinese dragon, or be left to watch the parade going by.

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