Research and Development Saved Britain. Maybe They Will Save U.S. Education

One of my summer goals is to read the entire 6 volume history of the Second World War by Winston Churchill. So far, I’m about halfway through the first volume, The Gathering Storm, about the period leading up to 1939.

The book is more or less a wonderfully written rant about the Allies’ shortsightedness. As Hitler built up his armaments, Britain, France, and their allies maintained a pacifist insistence on reducing theirs. Only in the mid-thirties, when war was inevitable, did Britain start investing in armaments, but even then at a very modest pace.

Churchill was a Member of Parliament but was out of government. However, he threw himself into the one thing he could do to help Britain prepare: research and development. In particular, he worked with top scientists to develop the capacity to track, identify, and shoot down enemy aircraft.

When the 1940 Battle of Britain came and German planes tried to destroy and demoralize Britain in advance of an invasion, the inventions by Churchill’s group were a key factor in defeating them.

Churchill’s story is a good analogue to the situation of education research and development. In the current environment, the best-evaluated, most effective programs are not in wide use in U.S. schools. But the research and development that creates and evaluates these programs is essential. It is useful right away in hundreds of schools that do use proven programs already. But imagine what would happen if federal, state, or local governments anywhere decided to use proven programs to combat their most important education problems at scale. Such a decision would be laudable in principle, but where would the proven programs come from? How would they generate convincing evidence of effectiveness?  How would they build robust and capable organizations to provide high-quality professional development materials, and software?

The answer is research and development, of course. Just as Churchill and his scientific colleagues had to create new technologies before Britain was willing to invest in air defenses and air superiority at scale, so American education needs to prepare for the day when government at all levels is ready to invest seriously in proven educational programs.

I once visited a secondary school near London. It’s an ordinary school now, but in 1940 it was a private girls’ school. A German plane, shot down in the Battle of Britain, crash landed near the school. The girls ran out and captured the pilot!

The girls were courageous, as was the British pilot who shot down the German plane. But the advanced systems the British had worked out and tested before the war were also important to saving Britain. In education reform we are building and testing effective programs and organizations to support them. When government decides to improve student learning nationwide, we will be ready, if investments in research and development continue.

This blog is sponsored by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation

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